The Big Think

May 23, 2014

Don’t Look Down

Filed under: Humor and Fun — jasony @ 9:32 pm

Photos That Will Make Your Stomach Drop: “”

Suspended Animation Goes Primetime

Filed under: Science — jasony @ 4:55 pm

Suspended Animation Goes Primetime: Say Goodbye To Death As We Know It – Forbes:

“As of March 29, 2014, a team of surgeons trained in this saline-cooling procedure is on emergency call at the UPMC Presbyterian Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In this field trial of the technique, patients who arrive at the hospital after having suffered cardiac arrest after traumatic injury (i.e. gunshots) and do not respond to attempts to restart their heart will be cooled with saline  to about 10 degrees Celsius (50 Fahrenheit). Their cellular activity will stop. They will be ‘clinically dead.’ But—if doctors can repair the trauma in roughly two hours—they are still capable of being revived.

In itself, this is amazing. This is two hours of suspended animation—which  has been the stuff of sci-fi for almost a century. Today it’s scientific fact.

But where things get really interesting is what happens tomorrow. As the technology progresses, it is not too much of a stretch to say those two hours of suspended animation will give way to four hours and eight hours and sooner or later whole days and weeks and months—in other words, we’ll have mastered artificial hibernation.”

Hit Me

Filed under: Humor and Fun,Science — jasony @ 3:25 pm

The Science of Bruce Lee’s One-Inch Punch:

“By the time the one-inch punch has made contact with its target, Lee has combined the power of some of the biggest muscles in his body into a tiny area of force. But while the one-inch punch is built upon the explosive power of multiple muscles, Rose insists that Bruce Lee’s muscles are actually not the most important engine behind the blow.

‘Muscle fibers do not dictate coordination,’ Rose says, ‘and coordination and timing are essential factors behind movements like this one-inch punch.’

Because the punch happens over such a short amount of time, Lee has to synchronize each segment of the jab—his twisting hip, extending knees, and thrusting shoulder, elbow, and wrist—with incredible accuracy. Furthermore, each joint in Lee’s body has a single moment of peak acceleration, and to get maximum juice out of the move, Lee must layer his movements so that each period of peak acceleration follows the last one instantly.

So coordination is key. And that’s where the neuroscience comes in.”

A Trophy for Tee Ball

Filed under: Education,Humor and Fun — jasony @ 9:06 am

Congratulations, graduates: you’ve done exactly what you’re expected and legally required to do!:

“We raise our children amidst constant preening, fawning, coddling, pampering, and congratulating, and then scratch our heads and wonder why they eventually enter adulthood so entirely unprepared for the rigors and challenges of the real world.

‘What?! I showed up to my job on time for a whole year, completed the minimum amount of work required, and performed at an overall standard, to slightly substandard, level — yet nobody’s handing me a ribbon or giving a lengthy speech heralding my many achievement?! Unacceptable! I’ve been bullied! I quit!’

We get them hooked on recognition and flattery at the age of three, and by the time they’re 23 they’ve become full-blown addicts. They develop a dependency on attention and affirmation, and can’t handle living in a universe that doesn’t stop to give them a cookie every time they complete some minor, routine task. This attention-seeking, ‘hey, notice me!’ mentality can lead them down a dark path towards resentment, jealousy, depression, and Snapchat accounts.”

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