The Big Think

December 29, 2015

It’s Come to This

Filed under: Education — jasony @ 11:21 am

FIRE Q&A: Reason@Brown’s Christopher Robotham – FIRE:

“‘At Brown, there is an underground group whose purpose is to allow kids to say what they ought to be free to say above ground.’

So begins Jay Nordlinger’s National Review profile of Reason@Brown. Christopher Robotham, 21, is the group’s founder. He tells FIRE that the by-invitation-only club is a forum where Brown students can engage in free expression in an atmosphere where open and vigorous debate is welcome and valued.”

Royal Presidency — When Presidents Act Like Kings

Filed under: Politics — jasony @ 10:29 am

This goes for both parties, by the way. And no, it’s not okay to support this behavior in your guy but oppose it when the other guy is in office. I’d say that we should make a law but there are already plenty on the books.

Royal Presidency — When Presidents Act Like Kings:

“And if Hamburger is wrong, and the Constitution’s silence on subdelegation should be taken to imply permission? Well, we should still be concerned. Seductive as it may sound, the claim that the administrative state is subject to meaningful democratic oversight is in practice rather weak. By its nature, the modern bureaucracy is a quasi-permanent force, vast swathes of which remain in operation regardless of who holds elective office and with what brief. For the administrators’ apologists to contend that our contemporary rule-makers are legitimate because they were empowered by those who were at one point elected will simply not cut the mustard. Now, as in Washington’s time, we write our laws down so that those who are bound by them know what they are bound by. There is no advantage to our doing so if the men tasked with enforcing them are permitted to suspend them or to fill out their meaning as their political desires demand.

Which is all to say that, pace Woodrow Wilson & Co., the recipe for political liberty is as it ever was. For men to be free, the law must be difficult to change, and it must be changed only by those whom we send to represent us; it must be universal and comprehensible in its application; it must be limited in its scope (by both hard rules and soft conventions); and it must be contrived, executed, and overseen by parties whose specialized functions are clearly set apart from one another. These conventions took a long time to develop, and they will take a long time to forget. But if they are circumvented often and egregiously enough, forgotten they will eventually be. There is always a crown beyond the horizon.”

(Via .)

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